Proficiency based grading is full of vocabulary and terminology.  It is important to note that, while standards and proficiencies are being implemented nationally, each school uses some terms that are all their own, and RHS is no exception.  Additional resources are available at The Vermont Agency of Education and The Glossary of Education Reform.

Listed below are some of the most commonly used terms that you’ll see regularly here at RHS.

Proficiency Based Learning: Synonymous with Standards Based Learning.  The practice of instructing and assessing students based on pre-determined expectations of what the student will know and be able to do.  Assessments provide students the opportunity to demonstrate their progress in meeting or exceeding the stated standard.

Standard: A statement of what a student is expected to know and be able to do by the end of a course of study.  Synonymous with Proficiency.

Overarching Standards: A general statement of what a student is expected to know and be able to do by the end of a course.  Most high school courses will have 3 to 6 overarching standards and each overarching standard includes multiple prioritized standards.  Overarching standards are reported on progress and quarterly reports.

Prioritized Standards: A specific statement of what a student is expected to know and be able to do by the end of a course.  Prioritized standards support more general categories called Overarching Standards.  Most high school courses will have a total of 20 prioritized standards, grouped into 3 to 6 overarching standards.

Summative Assessment: A culminating assessment of the degree to which a student has met the stated expectation of learning or standard.  Typical examples include projects, presentations, and tests.

Formative Assessment: An ongoing assessment of the degree to which a student has met the stated expectation of learning or standard.  Typical examples include class discussions, homework, and quizzes.

Common Assessment: An assessment of student learning which has been developed collaboratively by teachers in advance of a unit of study.  It is used for the purpose of analyzing the degree to which students have met the stated expectation of learning.

Habits of Work: The non-academic behaviors that a student is expected know and be able to demonstrate which lead to success.  Examples of habits include responsibility, collaboration, and perseverance.

Proficiency Scale:  Similar to a rubric, this grading tool lists for the student the expected standard and the prerequisite skills necessary to meet and exceed the standard.